Powerpoint Presentations

DISCLAIMER:
The Microsoft® Powerpoint® files linked from this page are intended for the exclusive use of Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service (PUCES) staff for their conduct of educational programs for the citizens of Indiana. Non-PUCES visitors to this page who desire to use these presentations for their own purposes should request permission to do so from the respective authors.
Instructions:
The presentations listed on this page include versions created with Microsoft Powerpoint 97, 2000, and 2002. Over time, more of the presentations will migrate toward the newer software version.
The file size of each presentation is listed in parentheses next to the link. You will note that some of the files are quite large, some would say humongous. I considered offering the files in a PKZIP-compressed [Link to http://www.pkware.com/software/pkzip/]  format that you could download to your computer, then uncompress. Unfortunately, I discovered that Powerpoint files do not compress much at all.
As another alternative for smaller downloads, I have begun to offer Adobe® Portable Document Format (PDF) versions of updated or new Powerpoint presentations, in both presentation (one slide per page) and handout (six slides to a page) views, in an attempt to minimize the size of some of the large original Powerpoint files.Adobe Acrobat® Reader® is free software that lets you view and print Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files. Click on the Acrobat Reader icon to access the Adobe download site.
If you are using the Netscape® Communicator® 4.xx, a dialog box will appear after you click on a link below and give you a choice of opening the file directly with Powerpoint (if it is installed on your computer) or saving the file to your hard drive. If you are using earlier versions of Netscape, you may need to press the <Shift> key at the same time you click on the link in order to save it to your hard disk. If you use Microsoft Internet Explorer® 5.xx, the Powerpoint file will open up (if Powerpoint is the default viewer for such files) when you click the left mouse button on the link. Alternatively, you can click the right mouse button and select "Save Target As..." to save the file to your hard drive.
If you run into problems accessing these files, please let me know [Link to Kelly Email].

Good Luck!.......Bob Nielsen [Link to http://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/corn/cornguy.html], Purdue Univ. Agronomy Dept

Presentations Listed Alphabetically

Best Management Practices for Relay Cropping of Soybean into Winter Wheat
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) [Link to PPT]
© 2004, Purdue University.
Tony Vyn, Purdue Agronomy (tvyn@purdue.edu)
Corn Growth & Development Relative to Herbicide Use
Powerpoint® 2000 version (7.8 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (1.5 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (462 KB) [Link to PDF]
Many post-emergence herbicide labels restrict the size or age of corn that can be treated. This presentation offers insight into the uncertainties of determining corn growth stages relative to herbicide usage.
© 2003, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Corn Planter Tuneups: Why Bother?
Online Powerpoint presentation [Link to http://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/ppt/PSV-2004_files/frame.html] (Req. IE v5.0 or newer)
Powerpoint® 2002 version (10.8 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (2.2 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (1.6 MB) [Link to PDF]
A presentation on the importance of uniform plant-to-plant spacing and emergence in corn, plus guidelines on improving planter performance..
© 2002-2004, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Life's Little Corn Problems: Tips on Crop Diagnostics
Powerpoint® 2000 version (20.3 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (6.9 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (4.5 MB) [Link to PDF]
This presentation shares my experiences in the art of crop diagnostics, including what questions to ask, how to look at a field, how to resist the know-it-alls, how to locate that missing puzzle piece, how to sneak away from the crowd, how to stick your foot in your mouth, and how to hem and haw with the best of them. I also share some experiences with photography, including digital imagery, from the perspective of capturing these precious moments in crop diagnostics.
© 2002-03, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Mitigate the Downside Risks of Second-Year Corn
Powerpoint® 2002 version (3.8 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (2.0 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (1.3 MB) [Link to PDF]
Written Summary (PDF format) [Link to PDF]
The advent of soybean rust across the southern U.S. late in 2004 has “added fuel to the fire” for some Indiana growers who were already perceiving an economic advantage for switching intended soybean acres to second-year corn acres in 2005. Agronomically, a continuous corn cropping system is fraught with a multitude of negative yield influencing factors. Most growers understand this. However, some are equally concerned that soybean rust, soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsamura), or other major soybean stresses in 2005 may result in unacceptably low soybean yields and/or high production costs. Consequently, some growers seem willing to accept the known risks associated with second-year corn in order to avoid the uncertain risks associated with soybean production in 2005. While most agronomists certainly do not encourage monoculture of any kind, one can at least offer suggestions for mitigating the downside risks of corn following corn for those growers who feel pressured to do so.
© 2005, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Protecting Your Non-GMO Grain From Contamination
Online Powerpoint presentation [Link to http://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/ppt/GMO-2005_files/frame.html] (Req. IE v5.0 or newer)
Powerpoint® 2002 version (9.9 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (2.8 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (1.8 MB) [Link to PDF]
Certain transgenic corn traits available to U.S. corn growers are not yet fully approved in the global marketplace, especially by the European Union. Consequently, certain U.S. grain buyers restrict their purchases to that from only approved hybrids and reject grain from non-approved hybrids or grain from fields of approved hybrids that is "contaminated" with transgenic grain. This so-called "contamination" can occur from mechanical mixing (commingling) of grain from different hybrids during planting, harvesting, or post-harvest operations. Pollen drift from transgenic hybrids can also cause "contamination" of neighboring fields due to cross-pollination. Consequently, growers who desire to maintain the non-transgenic purity of the grain in their production fields need to understand corn pollen biology, the dynamics of pollen drift, and possible methodologies for minimizing the risk of significant pollen "contamination" from adjacent fields of non-approved corn hybrids.
© 2003-2005, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Profitable Corn Management Strategies & Production Practices
Powerpoint® 2000 version (18.4 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (3.6 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (2.3 MB) [Link to PDF]
Timeless ideas and suggestions for improving agronomic efficiencies, and thus profitability, of corn production in Indiana.
© 2002-03, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Selecting Hybrids Wisely
Powerpoint® 2000 version (727 KB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (1.1 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (1.3 MB) [Link to PDF]
Hybrid selection is among the most important decisions that a grower makes each year, yet can be among the challenging. This presentation offers some guidelines for growers to consider when comparing hybrids.
© 2002-03, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Sparse versus Dense Spatial Data
Powerpoint® 97 version (1.2 MB) [Link to PPT]
Thoughts on the influence of the density of spatial data sets on the ability to accurately interpolate spatial variability in yield influencing factors.
© 2000, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Online version: Click here
Stalk Rots and Lodging in Corn
Powerpoint® 2000 version (6.5 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (1.4 MB) [Link to PDF]
Stalk rots and accompanying root & stalk lodging in corn can be devastating in their effects on yield and harvest losses.
© 2002, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Stand Establishment Issues & Concerns for No-Till Corn
Powerpoint® 2000 version (19.1 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (3.5 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (1.7 MB) [Link to PDF]
This presentation discusses the issues and challenges of achieving successfull stand establishment in no-till corn. Suggested agronomic decisions for improving stand establishment are described.
© 2003, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Stress & the Common Corn Plant
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (10 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (5.7 MB) [Link to PDF]
Corn's maximum yield occurs while it is still in the seed bag. After the seeds are planted, the remainder of the season is devoted to fighting off stresses of every shape and size. This presentation offers insight into the effects of stress on corn growth and development throughout the growing season.
© 2002-03, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Transgenic Crops in Indiana: Short-term issues for farmers
Powerpoint® 2000 version (1.3 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (1.5 MB) [Link to PDF]
A presentation about the market uncertainties surrounding transgenic crops (GMOs), cost/benefit issues of transgenic crops from an agronomic viewpoint, and the impact on farmers' choices on whether to plant these crops in the next few years.
© 2001, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Understanding Emergence & Stand Problems in No-Till Corn
Powerpoint® 97 version (3.0 MB) [Link to PPT]
A discussion on stand establishment problems common to no-till corn production.
© 1998, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Understanding Factors That Limit Yield in Corn
Powerpoint® 97 version (3.8 MB) [Link to PPT]
A discussion about yield limiting factors in corn, especially in relation to the adoption of site-specific farming technology.
© 1998, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)
Using On-Farm Research: Are Those Real Differences I'm Seeing?
Powerpoint® 2000 version (7.5 MB) [Link to PPT]
Adobe PDF version (Presentation view) (2.5 MB) [Link to PDF]
Adobe PDF version (Handout view) (1.0 MB) [Link to PDF]
The purpose of this presentation is to help growers and consultants better understand a few of the fundamental concepts of on-farm research.
© 2003, Purdue University.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue Agronomy (rnielsen@purdue.edu)