Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
:

DAA: Mamou K. Ehui

Mamou K. Ehui


Washington, D.C


Reading works by Maya Angelou. Listening to Natalie Cole, B.B. King, African music with lots of rhythm, and some jazz. Taking walks. These are the weekend pastimes that rejuvenate Mamou K. Ehui for the high profile, nonstop pace of the work week. She’s currently an agricultural economist at the World Bank on a one-year staff exchange program with the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. “One of my favorite pastimes is listening to music on weekends and enjoying quiet moments. This is because of my busy schedule during the week,” she says. “I also like walking, to re-energize and think.” These are imperatives in taking care of herself, Ehui says. So is traveling to Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa each December to spend time with her extended family, which includes two sisters, four brothers, aunts, uncles, cousins and her 4-year-old daughter, Marie Danielle. ‘This is what Africa is about - family,” she says. ‘We home from quite big families, and all the children are there. My husband has a very busy schedule, too, so these are very precious moments. That is why we don’t miss the holidays at home.” The substantive training Ehui received at Purdue has served her well in the decade she’s been at the United Nations, she says. “Now I appreciate the hard time my professors gave me,” she quips. At the U.N., she served the last five years as the first woman to be named special assistant to the executive secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, one of five U.N. commissions. ‘The groundwork at Purdue provided me with tools to successfully enter the U.N. system, to address and analyze economic problems, and to remain very competitive,” she says.to address and analyze economic problems, and to remain very competitive," she says.